What is Mango Wood? Features and Uses
Oct10

What is Mango Wood? Features and Uses

A preview of what is mango wood, its features, common uses and benefits.  Mango wood is the wood derived from the Mango tree (scientific name Mangifera Indica for its origin in India), found in tropical countries of Southeast Asia, Australia and the South Pacific Islands. The mango tree is planted in great numbers for the trade of its fruits. However, these trees reach their maturity in 15-20 years and their fruit bearing capacity reduces greatly. After that planters often cut the tree down and sell the wood. In the recent years, the wood has found many takers from furniture makers as well as consumers, both due to its pros as hardwood furniture material and its sustainability quotient. Features of Mango Wood Hardness: Mango wood is considered to be a hardwood. This strong and dense wood is at a rank of 1070 on the Janka hardness scale, comparable to black cherry wood or ash wood, and is perfect for furniture making as its durability is not affected by regular use. Though hardwood is difficult to cut and shape, mango wood is one of the softest hardwoods around making it suitable for use a construction material or for furniture making. Grain and Texture: In its natural form, mango wood grain is either straight or curly and interlocked. However, its look can be enhanced by polishing it. Color: The core of the mango tree or its heartwood is generally golden brown. However, at times, it may also be pink, with or without black streaks or golden brown. Why Go for Mango Wood Mango wood is sustainable: A lot of consumers today are more aware of the impact of development, tree cutting and CO2 emissions on environment and prepared to do their bit by going green. This has also prompted manufacturers to look for green or sustainable options while selecting components/raw materials as well as the manufacturing process. This is where the rising popularity of mango wood as furniture wood comes from. Mango trees need to be cut down after they stop bearing fruit and by this time they reach a height of almost 20 metres and wield too much wood to be simply left to rot or burnt as fuel. The fact that mango tree is planted mainly for its fruit, grows and matures relatively faster, and its wood can be used as durable construction or furniture material makes mango tree wood one of most sustainable options among woods. It has high water resistance: Since mango wood is resistant to water to a great extent, it is perfect for creating patio, deck or any other kind of outdoor furniture. For increased durability, it only needs...

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Best Wood For Cutting Board
Dec26

Best Wood For Cutting Board

When you’re cooking, it’s not enough to have good knives, you also need a sturdy chopping board. But which is the best wood for cutting board? In general, hardwood is a better option than the softwood because hardwoods have higher density, which means that they are harder. In your search for the wood cutting boards, you will find that these boards are made of three different methods of construction which you can choose from, depending on your budget and level of use. Types of wooden cutting boards Flat Panel: When boards are glued together at the edges, you get flat panel boards. Here, each wood piece is wider at the top of the surface of the block. If viewed from one end, you will find an arch on each board, or the end grain. Also called a face grain board, the flat panel board is the most inexpensive board to make but its disadvantages lie in the fact that it splits and warps with time. Edge Grain: Slightly more expensive than the flat panel cutting boards are the edge grain type. This kind of cutting board has several boards stuck face to face, with thin bands going across the surface top. These boards are thicker than the face grain types and less vulnerable to warping. In order not to split or crack, these boards do not have to be as thick as their end grain counterparts. These make for excellent wooden cutting boards. End Grain: This is the best of the three types of wooden cutting boards. The wood used here is joined together so that the end grain is in front of the work surface. Using this type of cutting board means you never have to worry about wood splintering. They are thicker butcher blocks than normal so there is no chance of warping, thereby adding to its stability. Check out some of these cutting boards below: John Boos Chop-N-Slice Maple Wood Reversible Cutting Board, 20″ x 15″x 1.25 Inch   John Boos RA03 Maple Wood Rdge Grain Reversible Cutting Board, 24 Inches x 18 Inches x 2.25 Inches   Large End Grain Prep Station, Acacia Wood   Fante’s Cousin Liana’s Italian Gnocchi Board, Beechwood, 8-Inches   Which wood to choose for a cutting board: The thumb rule is to choose wood from trees that have edible nuts or running sap. Traditionally, hard maple is chosen for its hardness, tight grain structure and weight. However, oak cutting board isn’t a good choice due to its open grain structure that is capable of trapping food particles. Exotic woods: On the subject of exotic woods as a choice for a...

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What is Sal Wood – Everything You Need to Know About it
Dec19

What is Sal Wood – Everything You Need to Know About it

One of the toughest timbers available today, sal wood has a hard and coarse grain. It is naturally a light-coloured wood but it turns dark on constant exposure to sunlight. It is highly resinous and durable, making it value for your money. For these reasons, it is highly prized in the construction industry. The Sal tree: It is derived from a tree popularly grown in forests in India and Nepal. It is one of India’s most important sources of hardwood. When freshly cut, it is identified by its light color and coarse grain. However, exposure to sunlight darkens its wood. Why Sal wood is used for windows Sal wood is cost-effective, very strong and durable, hence it is ideal for making the body of a truck. It is also used in the construction industry and to make furniture. It is readily available in a variety of shapes and sizes. So, customizing this wood for your specific needs is not a problem. This wood is strong enough to withstand water, making it ideal for use in cold climates. It is also heavier and tougher than teak and is resistant to fungi, water and termites. It is best to season the wood before using it as this helps display the properties of sal wood better. Differences between teak and sal wood Applications: Teak wood is highly prized in the finishing industry. Once the desired item is made and polished, it acquires a very rich look. Sal is valued in the construction industry for its strength, but not for its finishing. Maintenance: Teak requires very basic maintenance because it is strong and durable. Wiping teak furniture with a dry cloth every day is enough, while you can re-polish it once every few years. On the other hand, sal is durable, termite- and fungi-resistant. It should not be kept in the glare of direct sunlight as it will form cracks. Why sal wood is ideal for furniture: Sal wood is highly durable and very strong, for which reason it is ideal for making window sills, door, frames and beams. It can also withstand moisture, so it is easy to carry your sal furniture to a cold place and use it there without worrying about how it will react to the cold. It is also heavier and much tougher than teak wood. It is also resistant to termites, fungi and water. If you buy sal wood that has been seasoned, it will display better features and give you more satisfaction. Advantages Sal wood is 25% to 30% heavier than teak wood and 45% to 50% harder and more durable than teak. It is resistant...

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Types Of Wood In Australia For Furniture Purposes
Oct08

Types Of Wood In Australia For Furniture Purposes

The Australian continent isn’t only large. Its vastness has also spurred a variety of species of trees that are used for timber. Australian timber today encompasses a vast directory of wood for furniture, giving people here ample to choose from. Here are a wide selection of the best types of wood in Australia: Blackbutt: Foresters see this species as one that grows fast and has very high quality timber. Its sapwood is hard enough to resist termite and borer attacks, while its heartwood ranges in color from a yellowish to light brown. Its texture is coarse and its small gum veins with straight grains is easily evident. It is a strong and dense wood, easy to work with and moderately durable. It is best used to make flooring, furniture, decking, wood chopping, poles, railway sleepers, cladding, framework of buildings, lining boards and joinery. It is very dense at 900 kg/cubic meter. About 40% of its total growth comes from plantations in north New South Wales. Messmate Stringybark: A major Australian hardwood type, this one is not just denser than others but harder too. It is sold along with Mountain Ash and is known as Vic Ash. Its sapwood is pale brown while its heartwood is light brown. Its texture is even and it has straight grains that usually interlock, while you can even spot its distinctive rings. It also has gum veins. It can be stained, glued and worked with very easily and is right for steam bending. It has applications in construction, pulp production and manufacturing, especially in building houses, making furniture and flooring and joinery. It needs a cool climate, so it is common to Melbourne. Flooded Gum: Also called Rose Gum or Flooded Gum, this wood makes up 30% of New South Wales’ plantation stock. Its heartwood is quite durable. It is chosen to make furniture, joinery and panelling, and for general construction. Mountain (Vic) Ash: It is known by a number of names such as Tassie Oak, Vic Ash, Giant Ash, etc. It is commonly grown in south eastern Australia.  It is one of the world’s tallest tree species, often exceeding 114 meters or 374 feet. It is of medium weight and stringy in texture. It is common to see gum veins in Mountain Ash trees. Its wood is easy to saw and its grain is straight with definite sections, though it doesn’t have knots. Its timber is used for steam bending, apart from furniture, panelling, flooring, plywood, veneer, window frames and for general construction. Australian Wormy Chestnut: This species of tree is perhaps one of the most distinctive of all exotic trees worldwide. It has all...

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Which is the Best Wood for Carving?
Sep19

Which is the Best Wood for Carving?

There are all kinds of wood, each with its individual characteristics which may suit wood carving or may not. With differences in color and texture, it is useful to know at the outset which is the best wood for carving. Types of carving wood: Here are some types of softwood and hardwood that you can choose from: Softwoods Basswood: This is perhaps the best wood for carving for beginners. Possibly all novice carvers would want to work with basswood since it is malleable and affordable. This is ideal wood for carving because it is soft and has no grain. It is recognized as white wood with brown streaks. There is hardly any difference between its sapwood and heartwood. It is non-toxic, and widely used to make low cost musical instruments, such as woodwinds, guitars and electric basses. Pine: This is also a good choice and in some ways is similar to basswood. It is also soft and lends itself easily to carving, besides being widely available at a reasonable price. Cottonwood: This wood is white in color and has a bark that’s normally used to carve wooden spirits and quirky houses. However, being easy to carve and soft, the bark can also split. Aspen: Yet another white wood, it is popular among woodcarvers for its strength and ease of working for wood carving. It is also easy to find and reasonably priced. Wood carvers can create a range of low end items from this wood, such as matches, packaging material and inexpensive blanks. Butternut: Not as easy to find as pine, basswood and butternut, this one is popular for its superb coloring and grain. It belongs to the nut family and is therefore akin to the walnut tree, though lighter in color and better for carving. However, it is vulnerable to insects and often has wormholes. When polished, butternut looks very nice and is overall a good furniture choice. Being softer than other woods, it is good for beginners. Hard Woods Oak: Oak is by far the most popular of all carving woods, due to its unique features that lend itself to wood carving. It is very strong and robust and can withstand insects and rot. The grain of oak is considered very beautiful, and it is one of the favorite woods used for making furniture. Hobbyists and professionals love this wood, not only for its well-defined grain but also because it can be used to make all kinds of furniture. Walnut: Among hardwoods, walnut is extremely sought-after. Being a hardwood, it is difficult to hand carve it, so tools like a mallet and power tools are required. Its rich...

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Balsa Wood: Features and Uses
Sep16

Balsa Wood: Features and Uses

Balsa wood comes from Ochroma Lagopus. These trees are native to the rainforests of Central and South America. Here, these trees grow naturally from Guatemala in Central America to the northern and western coasts of South America till Bolivia. Ecuador on the western coast of South America is the No. 1 source of model aircraft grade balsa worldwide. This wood is ideally named as Balsa in Spanish means raft, referring to its excellence in floatation while in Ecuador it is also called Boya or buoy, referring to its high buoyancy. This world famous wood type is renowned for its lightness and softness. It ranges between four and seven kilos in weight per cubic foot. Despite this, it is classified as a hardwood, only for its broad leaves and the fact that it is not a conifer. Its salient feature is that it is extremely lightweight and versatile, and therefore finds applications in everything under the sun, ranging from making model airplanes and gliders to sports equipment and much more. Features Color and appearance: Balsa’s heartwood is identified as a pale rust in color and is not part of commercial timber. Most of its boards come from its sapwood, which could be off-white in color or tan, sometimes with a tinge of pink or yellow. Grain: Its grain is straight and it has a medium texture with a subdued lustre. It is characterized by three types of grain: A-Grain: This kind of sheet Balsa is distinctive for its long fibres that is apparent to the naked eye as long-lined grain. In sheets, Balsa is very flexible and can also bend at the curves very easily. It also warps very easily. B-Grain: In sheet form of this grain, Balsa displays some of the qualities of the A-Grain and the C-Grain. The grain lines here are shorter than those of A-Grain Grain and is stiffer to touch across the sheet. It can be used for a variety of purposes. C-Grain: In sheet form, this grain of Balsa has a beautifully mottled look. It feels stiff to touch across a sheet and can split very easily. However, by taking care to use it well, it can help build light and strong models. Of all three kinds of grain, this one is the most resistant to warping. It is often known as quarter grain. End grain: Its end grain has large pores in random arrangement. Rot resistance: Its sapwood is termed perishable and it is also prone to insect attack. Ease of working: It is easy to work with and is not so sharp that it dulls the sharp blades of cutters. However, its low...

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